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TV review: Sandford St Martin Awards

19 June 2020

BBC

Radio Times Readers Award went to BBC2’s lavish dramatisation of Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman’s Good Omens

Radio Times Readers Award went to BBC2’s lavish dramatisation of Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman’s Good Omens

THE heavy burdens of producing a weekly TV review are lightened, I must admit, by a few positives. As you would expect, I’m paid huge fees, and bask in universal celebrity and esteem. But, above all, there is the annual Sandford St Martin Trust Awards ceremony, when generous hospitality is lavished on the fortu­nate guests at Lambeth Palace.

But, this year, the whole affair was con­ducted online, streamed live on Thursday of last week and available to all at sandfordawards.org.uk/awards-2020. This is precisely the democra­tisation possible by means of social media, and the organisation did everything possible to maintain its splendid tradition of occasion, style, and drama.

Surely, for a celebration devoted to media communication, this is an unalloyed improvement, as medium and message are now completely in synch? But, just as some of us query bishops’ and arch­deacons’ delight that our current live-streamed, You­Tubed, virtual church is their longed-for break­through, decisive justification for the closure of fuddy-duddy old church buildings, so I mourn some essential virtues of the traditional format.

I have always found the occasion strangely transforming: seeing celeb­rities in the flesh gives vital per­spective to the judgements that I had formed from watching their pro­grammes. The brief conversations with producers and directors, with other journalists covering the event, with the mem­bers of judging panels, even the simple congratulations and commis­erations to winners and losers, brings depth and reality to the two-dimensional experience of watching television.

The event creates for a belea­guered niche in a doom-laden industry a sense of fellowship, com­munity, and confidence. Perhaps, after all, the incarnation was really on to something. Of course, Sand­­ford St Martin is wholly aware of all this, and promises that, next year, we will be back at Lambeth, canapés circulating and wine flowing.

The full awards results have al­­ready been reported (News, 12 June), comprising categories far wider than mere TV; so I confine myself to the briefest account. The TV/Video award went to For Sama (Channel 4), the most searing, pow­erful, and ultimately uplifting ac­­count of a child’s life in the hell of Aleppo.

I was particularly pleased that the Radio Times Readers Award went to BBC2’s lavish dramatisation of Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman’s Good Omens, as it gives me an opportunity to recant. My account of the first episode was decidedly sniffy, but the series grew in depth and moral stature. Its climax, as the innocent child hero renounced his satanic blandishments of power and ac­­cepted loss and mortality, was a pro­found, funny, and moving retelling (whatever the authors intended) of the Christian story.

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