Churches embark on 100 days of prayer in run-up to Armistice Day centenary

10 August 2018

PA

The Duke of Cambridge and Theresa May arrive at Amiens Cathedral in France, on Wednesday afternoon, for a service to mark the centenary of the Battle of Amiens, and the subsequent “Hundred Days Offensive” which was a decisive point towards the end of the First World War PA

The Duke of Cambridge and Theresa May arrive at Amiens Cathedral in France, on Wednesday afternoon, for a service to mark the centenary of the Battle ...

CHURCHES around the country have begun 100 days of prayer for peace to mark the centenary of the end of the First World War.

“100 Days of Peace and Hope” began on Saturday, marking a similar national day of prayer held on 4 August 1918; 100 days after this, Armistice Day occurred.

The six presidents of Churches Together in England have called upon six congregations to join the days of prayer. The Archbishop of Canterbury, who was one of the six, said: “From 4 August 2018, in churches across this country, let us mark 100 days with prayers for peace, hope, and reconciliation.”

The original National Day of Prayer was called by King George V, who attended a special service in St Margaret’s, Westminster, with members of the Houses of Parliament.

The Revd Nims Obunge, Deputy Lord Lieutenant for London and the CEO of the Peace Alliance, welcomed the support of the royal family. He said: “I am delighted that Buckingham Palace is acknowledging this significant anniversary.

“As part of Remembrance 100 we are encouraging communities across the country to organise peace prayer events, community peace talks, peace festivals, peace arts and poetry competitions, peace projects and many more community building activities. In London, we are praying for peace, particularly in the light of rising knife crime.”

Blackburn Cathedral, which is taking part in the initiative, tweeted on Saturday: “#Remembrance100 has started at the cathedral. Come in and light a candle or use our prayer resources over the next 99 days.”

Roy Crowne, HOPE’s executive director, said: “As well as reflecting on loss, this year also gives us the chance to look forward with hope as we mark the end of World War 1.

“We have set up Remembrance 100 in partnership with others, to help churches bring communities together to mark this significant point in our history, to pray, and to look for ways to bring peace and hope.”

Resources have been collated by HOPE: www.remembrance100.co.uk/100-days.

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