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Quotes of the week

by
01 July 2022

istock

Legal abortion being banned, does not mean no abortion. It means rich people travelling to other states for abortion. . . It means women who can’t afford it, being forced to give birth. . . For those who are celebrating, your fight does not end here — unless the fight you are really waging is a fight to control women’s bodies — your fight for the little children is really just beginning and encompasses way more than simply ensuring they are born

Selina Stone, tutor and lecturer in political theology, Twitter, 25 June, on Roe v. Wade ruling

 

So how do we now channel Evangelical passion in support of universal daycare, child tax credits, affordable housing, a livable minimum wage, paid family leave and health insurance for poor single moms?

Rich Stearns, President Emeritus, World Vision USA, Twitter, 26 June, responding to Roe v. Wade ruling

 

As a patriot, I would not want to do anything that would diminish this country in the eyes of the world. This Bill [the Northern Ireland Protocol Bill] is not legal in international law, it will not achieve its aims, and it will diminish the UK in the eyes of the world

Theresa May, House of Commons, 27 June

 

It is difficult enough for the Church to persuade people that the Christian message is true (we’ve all seen the stats). Pushing away those who don’t hold to the ideologies of the current bench of bishops is foolish in the extreme

Marcus Walker, Rector of Great St Bartholomew’s, Smithfield, Telegraph, 25 June

 

My father . . . used to drive us to St Canice’s Church of Ireland Church, because he felt that my mother should have the choice in what religion we grew up in. So, we went to this little Church of Ireland church, and then he would drive to St Canice’s, the Catholic church, that was 100 yards away. It was so mad. You know, they say you get just enough religion to inoculate you against it. I didn’t. They spared me, both of them, from any doctrinal stuff

Bono, Desert Island Discs, Radio 4, 26 June

 

Feeling sorry for all those whose ordinations clash with Glastonbury — thank goodness for iPlayer!

Julie Conalty, Bishop of Birkenhead, Twitter, 25 June

 

The mainstream churches are all too conscious of their failure to connect with contemporary popular culture and get their message across in a way that people today find accessible and understandable. . . They might usefully start by looking at some of Abba’s songs with their undeniably spiritual message and their wide appeal, and embrace rather than dismiss them

Ian Bradley, Credo, The Times, 25 June

 

I found Joe Miller’s report on The Fuggerei fascinating (House & Home, June 17&18). Residents of this social housing complex are required to recite daily prayers for the founder’s family. After 500 years that is the best return on investment that a Catholic could possibly ask for. Henry VII ordered 10,000 Masses for his soul, but I doubt the monks of Westminster Abbey had enough time before being turfed out

Lech Handzel-Bonavia, Letters, Financial Times, 24/25 June

 

I assume that after this E&Y, and the other big accounting firms, will drastically tighten up their procedures around, like, accountants emailing each other the answers for the open-book at-home multiple-choice online ethics exam. Possibly that will result in their accountants knowing somewhat more about the ethical code of accountancy. Still I am not convinced that the multiple-choice online exam is the best way to inculcate a sense of ethics into your workforce. So far it does not seem to work very well

Matt Levine, Bloomberg, 28 June

 

We invite readers’ contributions. Quotations have to be from the past few days (or quoted therein), and we need author, source, and date. Please send promptly to: quotes@churchtimes.co.uk

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Sat 13 Aug @ 08:46
“Due process will now follow, through the clergy disciplinary canon. . . The suspension will be kept under regular… https://t.co/hSGF8V2R7D

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