*** DEBUG START ***
*** DEBUG END ***
Important information: We are currently experiencing technical issues with the webiste and it is currently running with reduced functionality, some category pages may not contain a full list of articles and the search is not currently working. We apologise for the inconvenience and should have everything back to normal as soon as possible.

Sub-Sahara children at most risk of starving to death, charity warns

11 September 2020

PA

A Sudanese girl sleeps under the shade of a tree on the street, on Tuesday, after a flood swept the neighbourhood in Khartoum, Sudan

A Sudanese girl sleeps under the shade of a tree on the street, on Tuesday, after a flood swept the neighbourhood in Khartoum, Sudan

BEFORE the end of this year, 67,000 children could die of hunger in Sub-Saharan Africa, a charity has warned.

Save the Children has calculated that, on average, 426 children a day are at risk of dying from hunger and malnutrition in the region. Young children under five are most at risk. The spread of coronavirus follows devastating floods and swarms of locusts which have destroyed crops in the region (News, 1 May).

Before the pandemic, 2.6 million children in Sub-Saharan Africa were suffering from the deadliest form: severe acute malnutrition (SAM). Now, as livelihoods have been destroyed and health services left inaccessible or unavailable, 15.4 million children are expected to suffer from SAM by the end of the year.

Save the Children examined data from a study in the journal The Lancet, published this summer, which said that the impact of the pandemic on low- and middle-income countries could lead to an additional 128,605 deaths of children under five: 52 per cent would occur in Sub-Saharan Africa.

The charity’s regional director for East and Southern Africa, Ian Vale, said: “Coronavirus measures have decimated livelihoods and crop production, jobs have dried up, and food is becoming increasingly expensive — if it’s available at all. Simply put, many parents can no longer put food on the table for their children. . .

“We’re already seeing more children arriving at our clinics every day suffering from malnutrition, and we know that we’re only at the beginning. If we wait until clinics are full, it will be too late. The food crisis could kill tens of thousands of children unless they are reached with humanitarian assistance immediately.”

The International Food Policy Research Institute has predicted that food poverty will grow dramatically across the globe in 2020. Sub-Saharan African will be one of the hardest hit, with a 23 per cent increase in those classed as falling into extreme poverty: a rise of 80 million people.

By 2030, it is predicted that an estimated 433 million people will be malnourished across Africa.

Save the Children has launched an appeal to raise funds to support what it says are “some of the most deprived children in the world”.

savethechildren.net

Forthcoming Events

29 September 2020
Festival of Preaching
A one-day online version of our popular preaching festival. With Mark Oakley, Sam Wells and Anna Carter Florence.   Book tickets

 

19 October 2020
Creativity out of crisis: Hymns and worship webinar
In association with RSCM, this online event will explore creative uses music and liturgy in the context online and socially distanced worship.    Book tickets

Welcome to the Church Times

​To explore the Church Times website fully, please sign in or subscribe.

Non-subscribers can read four articles for free each month. (You will need to register.)