More Bolshevism at home

by
09 August 2019

August 8th, 1919.

THE police strike has been airily called a fiasco, and so it has very nearly proved in London at all events, but in Liverpool it is another matter. Enormous damage to property has resulted, accompanied by the killing of one or two people. There, to some extent, the Bolshevist movement — for it is nothing else: certainly it is not trade unionism — has had a measure of success, even if it shall not be very long-lived. The plan seems to be to follow up a strike in one service or industry with a sympathetic “lightning” strike in other industries, as in the case of the London and South Western Railway and that of the Liverpool docks. It appears to be thought by the extremists that, if they can inflict all manner of discomfort and suffering on the public, the Government will be forced to give way and to yield to any demands, however extravagant. There, we think, they will find themselves mistaken in the long run. The main body of Labour is perfectly sound, and when once it perceives that the policy of “direct action” is nothing but a conspiracy against constitutional law and order it will rank itself on the side of the State. The Government has only to stand firm, to refuse the reinstatement of the men it has dismissed from its service, and to use every power of which it is possessed to crush every attempt at a revolution. It has the country at its back

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