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Preachers and hotheads

by
04 October 2019

October 3rd, 1919.

THE Pulpit Interchange discussion is still continuing in the columns of the Times, but it only serves to bring out fresh proof of the lawlessness that prevails in the Church as well as in the world outside. The Bishop of Zanzibar [Frank Weston] protests against the lawlessness of the bishops who sanction or advocate the interchange of pulpits [with Dissenters], and asks how they can expect their clergy to abstain from lawless acts. What would they say, if a parish priest could induce a Roman priest to come, out of service hours, to the parish church and give the people a clear call back to the feet of St Peter? It is a pity that he spoiled a forcible argument by proposing to act lawlessly on his own part. He is willing, he says, to come to the help of any parish that cannot accept its diocesan bishop’s ministrations because of his irregularity, and to provide the episcopal ministrations that are required. He considers his proposed action analogous to the Bishop of London’s claim to confirm and ordain in North and Central Europe. He admits that such proceeding would result in chaos, but is prepared to take the risk, throwing the responsibility on the Bishop of Norwich and other bishops following his lead. This is all very deplorable, and nothing could be weaker than the analogy of the Bishop of London’s ministrations in North and Central Europe.

 

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