Painting the Crucifixion and Resurrection

by
29 March 2018

SUSIE HAMILTON

Dark Beach by Susie Hamilton (CN). “Both paintings are scenes of leisure in which figures, unconcerned with anything other than enjoying a day out, are overtaken by another reality, flooding them with darkness or light. Darkness (such as the dark­ness overcoming the earth on the day of the Crucifixion) is sweeping across the glare of the sand, while the painting based on the idea of Resur­rection, Light Beach, is influenced by Henry Vaughan’s poem ‘They are All Gone into the World of Light’, and whirls figures into a burst of phosphorescent pink and violet” (RN)

Dark Beach by Susie Hamilton (CN). “Both paintings are scenes of leisure in which figures, unconcerned with anything other than enjoying a day o...

THESE illustrations (see gallery above for more) come from “Crossings: Art and Christianity Now”, a free, two-part exhibition by 36 contemporary artists in Southwell Minster. Part one, “Crucifixion Now” (CN), was on display until 21 March. No artworks are on display during Holy Week. Part two, “Resurrection Now” (RN), is unveiled at Easter, and runs until 10 May.

“We need to see both crucifixion and resurrection in order to know the Christian story, and missing out on either results in something other than Christianity,” writes the Revd Matthew Askey, Chaplain of South­well Minster School, in the guide to the exhibition.

“The suffering of the cross is the action that leads to the new life of resurrection, which we all can benefit from today. We must cross over (literally, make a crossing) in order to move from one to the other, as Christ opens the way for us.”

www.southwellminster.org

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