New George Bell material sparks fresh investigation

31 January 2018

Bishop George Bell

Bishop George Bell

ON WEDNESDAY, the Church of England’s national safeguarding team announced that it had received “fresh information concerning Bishop George Bell”. The statement gives no further details, on the grounds of confidentiality, but goes on: “Sussex Police have been informed and we will work collaboratively with them.

“This new information was received following the publication of the Carlile Review, and is now being considered through the Core Group and in accordance with Lord Carlile’s recommendations. The Core Group is now in the process of commissioning an independent investigation in respect of these latest developments.”

In a covering note, the Bishop of Bath & Wells, the Rt Revd Peter Hancock, the Church of England’s lead bishop on safeguarding, spoke of “ongoing queries and comments around the Bishop Bell case”. He asks “that we keep all those involved in our thoughts and prayers. . .

“Due to the confidential nature of this new information, I regret I cannot disclose any further detail until the investigations have been concluded.”

The statement in full reads: “The Church of England’s National Safeguarding Team has received fresh information concerning Bishop George Bell. Sussex Police have been informed and we will work collaboratively with them.

“This new information was received following the publication of the Carlile Review, and is now being considered through the Core Group and in accordance with Lord Carlile’s recommendations. The Core Group is now in the process of commissioning an independent investigation in respect of these latest developments.

“As this is a confidential matter we will not be able to say any more about this until inquiries have concluded.”

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