New user? Register here:
Email Address:
Password:
Retype Password:
First Name:
Last Name:
Existing user? Login here:
 
 
World >

UK aid boosts South Sudanese girls

Madeleine Davies

by Madeleine Davies

Posted: 07 Apr 2017 @ 12:05

GESS

Click to enlarge

Inspired: girls in South Sudan speak in a film shown in Parliament about how their hopes and aspirations have been transformed by an education programme funded by UK aid

Credit: GESS

Inspired: girls in South Sudan speak in a film shown in Parliament about how their hopes and aspirations have been transformed by an education programme funded by UK aid

GIRLS receiving an education in South Sudan with the help of UK aid spoke via film in Parliament last week, highlighting their aspirations to build careers and transform the world’s youngest country.

The film, Girls’ Education South Sudan — Inspire. Educate. Transform, showcases the achievements of Girls’ Education South Sudan (GESS), a five-year £60-million programme owned by the government of South Sudan and funded by UK aid. Launched in 2013, the year in which conflict erupted in the country, it has so far given 3500 schools more than 9000 grants, and made more than 300,000 bank transfers to 180,000 girls.

Another facet of the programme, which seeks to bring about a “sea change in attitudes towards education”, is a series of radio programmes, which have reached about two million people, with messages designed to prompt communities to embrace and own education. GESS has managed to retain teachers, even when the authorities failed to pay salaries, because the schools are embedded within communities, who can help to meet their needs.

Two-thirds of South Sudan’s school-age children are not in school, and the adult literacy rate is just 27 per cent. Girls experience additional obstacles, including pressure to marry. A GESS team leader, Akuja Mading de Garang, describes in the film how an estimated 30,000 girls were “missing” from the programme, owing to displacement, but were being traced, “even in refugee camps”.

Many of GESS’s partners are churches or Christian organisations, including the United Methodist Committee on Relief, Adventist Development and Relief Agency, Food for the Hungry, Episcopal Church of South Sudan & Sudan, and Caritas.

A study of GESS by the Center for Global Development and the University of Sussex concluded that grants and cash transfers made schools more likely to remain open, increase their enrolment numbers, and increase the attendance rate.

https://youtu.be/gJ9xGgbPuBk

Job of the week

General Secretary

UK

Modern Church Deeper understanding of Christian faith Modern Church encourages open, respectful debate and discussion of matters relating to Christian faith. Originally a Church of England society, ...  Read More

Signup for job alerts
Top feature

The runaway nun of the Reformation

The runaway nun of the Reformation

In a talk to be broadcast next week on Radio 3, Charlotte Woodford explores the life of Martin Luther’s wife, Katharina von Bora  Subscribe to read more

Top comment

Parliamentarians’ beliefs deserve a fair hearing

Nick Spencer examines why they are nervous of talking about faith  Read More

Sat 29 Apr 17 @ 21:19
Can you help to #trainapriest? https://t.co/SDl5AJZKDn

Sat 29 Apr 17 @ 20:16
Interfaith dialogue ‘needs more bite’ say @chrismusforum https://t.co/tG106pqmgQ