Mission aids homeless in Bulgaria

10 March 2017

MISSION WITHOUT BORDERS

“Street Mercy”: MWB volunteers run a mobile soup kitchen in Sofia

“Street Mercy”: MWB volunteers run a mobile soup kitchen in Sofia

FOUR thousand homeless people have been supported in Bulgaria, one of the poorest countries in Europe, during the five years of a street mission run by the Christian charity Mission Without Borders (MWB).

Its Street Mercy programme sup­ports children who have left insti­tutions, young people who are un­­em­ployed, and those with addic­tions or mental or physical dis­abilities.

The project, in the capital, Sofia, is run by volunteers who are on the streets 365 days a year, even when temperatures reach −20°. They offer practical as well as emotional sup­port, including counselling.

MWB’s manager in Bulgaria, Sarkis Ovanesyan, said: “The aim of the project has always been simple: to provide and show Christian love to the most vulnerable in our soci­ety.”

The former communist country joined the EU in 2007, but has strug­gled economically: it has the lowest GDP in Europe. It was also issued with a warning this year by the Euro­­pean Commission about its high levels of corruption and its fail­ure to tackle organised crime.

The country is also facing polit­ical turmoil: early elections are being held this month. The Prime Minister, Boiko Borisov, on the centre-Right, resigned after the victory of a Russia-friendly candid­ate, backed by the opposition Social­ists, in the presidential election last No­­vember.

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