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Room among Anglicans for a dinosaur, surely . . .

by
31 July 2015

© natural History museum picture library

“Dippy”: the 26m-long skeleton has been a popular Natural History Museum exhibit for at least a century

“Dippy”: the 26m-long skeleton has been a popular Natural History Museum exhibit for at least a century

From Mr Nigel Williams

Sir, — An opportunity has arisen to remind the public of the essential compatibility of mainstream Christianity and scientific observation.

The Natural History Museum is requesting venues for a national tour of its plaster cast of a diplodocus skeleton. At 22 metres, it will fit inside any cathedral and a great many churches. However people interpret it, the implicit message is that the Church can accommodate the fossil record.

The mistaken belief that the Church of England is made up of creationists has long been an obstacle to mission, especially among younger adults. I urge anyone with a large enough church to offer this dinosaur a home.

 

NIGEL WILLIAMS
11 Worple Road, Epsom
Surrey KT18 5EW

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