‘Jihadi John’ attended a C of E school

27 February 2015

PA

London link: Asim Qureshi (left) of Cage, sits with John Rees (centre) of Stop the War Coalition and Cerie Bullivant, as he speaks about the person he knows as Mohammed Emwazi, who has been named as the Islamic State executioner 'Jihadi John', during a press conference at the P21 Gallery, in central London

London link: Asim Qureshi (left) of Cage, sits with John Rees (centre) of Stop the War Coalition and Cerie Bullivant, as he speaks about the person ...

THE man identified as 'Jihadi John' - the notorious Islamic State terrorist filmed beheading Western hostages - attended a Church of England primary school in West London, it has been reported.

Mohammed Emwazi, who was born in Kuwait but grew up in Britain, was said to be Jihadi John by the Washington Post on Thursday. He attended St Mary Magdalene Church of England Primary School, near Paddington, from 1996.

He later studied computing at the University of Westminster before leaving for Syria in 2013. He became infamous after appearing on numerous Islamic State videos, with his face covered by a black mask, waving a knife at the camera before appearing to murder hostages including journalists and aid workers.

It has been reported that his siblings and parents still live in London. When approached on Friday, St Mary Magdalene school and the dicoese of London declined to comment.

The group Cage, which campaigns on behalf of those they claim are being harassed and mistreated by the security services, said yesterday that Mr Emwazi appealed for their help in 2009 after he was briefly detained and questioned by intelligence officers while trying to visit Tanzania.

He was both accused of attempting to reach the civil war in Somalia, and asked to become an informant for MI5. Cage also said that he was then repeatedly prevented from emigrating to Kuwait. The Government has not commented on these claims.

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