Would you buy a used car from this vicar?

24 April 2015

iSTOCK

MORE than three-quarters of the population would not trust a priest to sell them a car, a survey from vehicle-data firm HPI suggests.

Although the poll found that only one in four buyers would believe what a cleric - of any denomination - told them, no other trade or calling was better regarded. The next most trustworthy group was said to be mechanics, who found favour with 19 per cent of the 300 people questioned by Gorkana Surveys. Behind them were doctors and other medical professionals, at 15 per cent, and teachers, at 12 per cent.

Least trusted were builders, who were backed by just one per cent of those questioned. IT professionals were backed by two per cent, and the military found four per cent support. Lawyers and accountants were on a par with sales professionals, at six per cent. 

Despite the low rating for the armed forces, however, 47 per cent of those questioned said they would be more likely to buy a used car from a person wearing a uniform. Police, firefighters, and nurses were the most popular.

"Nearly half of the people we surveyed would be swayed by a used-car seller in a uniform, which means they could also be duped by shiny paintwork and a rock-bottom price. If that vehicle is stolen or on outstanding finance, an unsuspecting buyer could lose the vehicle and what they paid for it, when it's returned to the rightful owner," said Noel Hodson, managing director of HPI, which provides background details of cars for potential buyers.

"It's important to remember that unscrupulous sellers will do whatever it takes to con innocent used-car buyers out of their cash, including impersonating people in authority. That's why we advise buyers to use their head, not their heart."

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