*** DEBUG START ***
*** DEBUG END ***

World news in brief

by
12 June 2015

reuters

Family grief: relatives mourn Aftab Bahadur, aged 38, after his execution in Lahore, on Wednesday. Mr Bahadur, a Christian, was 15 when sentenced, and campaigners believe that he was tortured into confessing

Family grief: relatives mourn Aftab Bahadur, aged 38, after his execution in Lahore, on Wednesday. Mr Bahadur, a Christian, was 15 when sentenced, a...

South Sudanese leaders warn against genocide

SOUTH Sudan must not permit a genocide on the scale of Rwanda's, a coalition of South Sudanese church leaders have said, after a visit to Rwanda. The South Sudan Council of Churches said that they were appointed by God to be watchmen over their nation, and ordered those involved in South Sudan's "senseless" civil war to choose peace and forgiveness. "We came to Rwanda to learn because we must prevent such a terrible atrocity from happening in our own country," they said.

 

Sydney leads opposition to same-sex marriage

CHURCH leaders in Australia, including the Archbishop of Sydney, the Most Revd Glenn Davies, have signed an open letter to the prime minister urging him not to legalise same-sex marriage. The message was sent by the Archbishop, together with his Roman Catholic counterpart, the Most Revd Anthony Fisher, as well as Pentecostal and Orthodox leaders, rabbis, and imams. It said the current legal definition of marriage reflected a deeply held belief about the institution held across the faith communities. The opposition Labour party has signalled that it intends to introduce a same-sex-marriage Bill soon.

 

Saudi Arabian floggings to go ahead

THE Saudi Arabian Supreme Court has upheld the sentence of 1000 lashes and ten years in prison for an atheist blogger found guilty of insulting Islam. The blogger, Raif Badawi, was convicted after setting up an online forum to debate liberal reform in Saudi Arabia (News, 23 January). He was given the first 50 lashes in January, but the rest had been postponed after outrage was expressed internationally.

 

Eritrea accused of systemic human-rights crimes

A REPORT by the UN has found that the government of Eritrea has committed "systemic and gross" human-rights violations that could amount to crimes against humanity. As well as "ubiqituous" arbitrary detention, torture, and sexual violence against female conscripts, Eritrea also oppresses religious minorities, the report says. Adherents are often arrested, tortured, and coerced to recant, and some have disappeared.

Welcome to the Church Times

​To explore the Church Times website fully, please sign in or subscribe.

Non-subscribers can read four articles for free each month. (You will need to register.)