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CPA: 'It's obvious that we need a Christian alternative'

01 May 2015

PA

Ukippa: Nigel Farage on the campaign trail, in Tiny Tim's tearoom in Rochester High Street, last week 

Ukippa: Nigel Farage on the campaign trail, in Tiny Tim's tearoom in Rochester High Street, last week 

THE Christian People's Alliance (CPA) is the "natural home" of Conservative voters who are angry about the legalisation of same-sex marriage, its party's leader has said.

Speaking on Tuesday, Sid Cordle, a former Conservative councillor and parliamentary candidate, said that his party blended the economic policies of the Tories with a distinctly "Christian" morality.

"What the Conservatives have done in moral issues is frankly appalling," he said. "It's obvious that we need a Christian alternative." He said voters who had switched to UKIP were "misguided", as the party does not oppose gay marriage, only churches being forced to conduct them.

He said that, while the Government had been "very successful" in handling the economy, the CPA had more concern for the poor, and would end zero-hours contracts, and raise the minimum wage.

The Labour Party and the Liberal Democrats had nothing to offer Christians, Mr Cordle said. "Inequality is not a Christian concept at all. We have got to have people in this country who create wealth."

When asked what his manifesto priorities were, Mr Cordle pointed to proposals to pay £10,000 to couples getting married on condition that they attend marriage-preparation classes, and £5000 to parents of a first child if it is born inside wedlock.

He also said he wanted to crack down on abortion, by "forcing people to consider other options", and stop giving foreign aid to countries which persecuted Christians.

The CPA, founded in 1999, has previously won seats on Newham Council, but has never had an MP, and is fielding only 17 candidates this year.

Mr Cordle insisted, however, that his party was ready to grow in significance, comparing it with where UKIP was 15 years ago. "People are looking for an alternative. We have only got 17 candidates, but if we had 500 we would be challenging the Lib Dems.

"This election is not the end of the story, but part of a process going on, year on year, growing as a party until we become a major party in this country."

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