*** DEBUG START ***
*** DEBUG END ***

Calls for a Lawrence inquiry

by
05 July 2013

by a staff reporter

PA

Aggrieved: Doreen Lawrence, Stephen's mother, leaves the Home Office with her son Stuart, after a meeting with the Home Secretary Theresa May, last week

Aggrieved: Doreen Lawrence, Stephen's mother, leaves the Home Office with her son Stuart, after a meeting with the Home Secretary Theresa May, last ...

THE Church of England has called for a full inquiry into the allegations that the police tried to smear the family of the murdered teenager Stephen Lawrence.

The Church's Committee for Minority Ethnic Anglican Concerns, which is chaired by the Archdeacon of Reigate, the Ven. Daniel Kajumba, said that fears that there was "a rottenness at the core of UK policing" could be examined only by a "full, open, and independent investigation, now".

The Lawrence family and the Labour Party have called for an inquiry into the allegations by a former police officer, Peter Francis, that he was asked to find "dirt" on the Lawrence family. The Home Secretary, Theresa May, has instructed two existing inquiries to examine the allegations.

The Committee's statement said: "If true, the allegations . . . in recent days would show beyond doubt that we are not just hearing the revelation that some police officers behaved appallingly to the family and friends of a murder victim 20 years ago. In the light of what has been alleged, many people are now concluding that significant numbers of police officers, including some at senior level, knew of, and approved of, what was happening. The belief that this was not just a few bad apples, but a rottenness at the core of UK policing, needs to be tested . . .

"These new allegations do, sadly, resonate with the belief of many black and minority ethnic Anglicans that institutional racism within UK policing is not simply an entry in the history books, but a sickening reality today."

Job of the Week

Appointments

Welcome to the Church Times

​To explore the Church Times website fully, please sign in or subscribe.

Non-subscribers can read four* articles for free each month. (You will need to register.)