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Dean of Jersey back at work after saying sorry

03 May 2013

SHUTTERSTOCK

THE Dean of Jersey, the Very Revd Bob Key, has been reinstated after he made a belated apology for his handling of a safeguarding complaint ( News, 15 March).

On Sunday, a statement from the diocese of Winchester quoted the Dean's words: "I regret mistakes that I made in the safeguarding processes and I understand that, upon reflection, it would have been more helpful if I had co-operated more fully with the Korris Review.

"I now add my own apology to that of the Bishop of Winchester and Archbishop of Canterbury to the vulnerable person at the heart of this matter. I will be co-operating with the visitation and investigation announced by the Bishop on 26 March."

The statement also said that the Bishop of Winchester, the Rt Revd Tim Dakin, "acknowledges that, although mistakes were made, the Dean believed he was acting in good faith. Following the commitment that the Dean has made, the Bishop has decided that he will issue a new Commission to the Dean with immediate effect.

"The Bishop and the Dean have also agreed that, in the light of these recent events, there are areas in Jersey Canon Law which would benefit from further review, and they are committed to working together as necessary to revise them."

On Tuesday, Bishop Dakin said that Dean Key's apology to the victim was "most important".

An investigation into the Korris Review, looking at the facts and recommendations in it, would be completed "in weeks" and led by a judge. The visitation led by Bishop John Gladwin ( News, 22 March) would be a "wider process" exploring the relationship between the deanery, the diocese, and the Church of England. Bishop Dakin said that the investigation could have implications for the future of Dean Key, returning to matters highlighted in the Korris Review which were "serious enough for me to have withdrawn his commission" but he was "hoping we can work together in the future positively".

On Sunday, Dean Key told BBC Radio Jersey that "the reinstatement came about because people get reconciled." Given the choice to do things differently, he would have ensured that "my record-keeping was absolutely state-of-the-art". Asked whether he would look back on recent weeks as a "learning curve", he said: "No. I'll look back and see it as a time of pain. . .

"I think I'll look back on this time as a period where I learned a little bit more that God is God and I am not, and that I learned to trust him even when things are really very tough."

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