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UK news

by
22 November 2013

LOUISE WHIFFIN/DIOCESE OF ROCHESTER

Next Bishop to HM Prisons announced

THE Bishop of Rochester, the Rt Revd James Langstaff, is to be the next Bishop to HM Prisons, the senior Church advocate in the criminal-justice system in England and Wales, it was announced on Monday. He succeeds the Rt Revd James Jones, who retired in August. Bishop Langstaff said: "Criminal-justice issues have a high profile within our society and, with others, I will be seeking to offer a Christian perspective within those discussions. The treatment of prisoners has been a Christian concern for centuries. . . It is important that we continue to engage clearly with these issues."

Bishop of London: 'We need cyber friars'

THE Church too often fails to recognise its internet presence, the Bishop of London, the Rt Revd Richard Chartres, told the Christian New Media Conference a fortnight ago. "We have found it hard to relocate resources and redesign the training of those in ministry to recognise the fact," he said. "Cyberspace is the new town square, and we need dedicated cyber friars to ensure that the Christian voice is represented not only by the deeply weird and furiously judgemental, but that we are able to engage aptly in the fundamentally theological debates which are happening well outside any of our churches."

New Dean of Chelmsford; Yorkshire merger

THE Revd Nicholas Henshall (right), Vicar of Christ Church, Harrogate, and Acting Archdeacon of Richmond, is to become the next Dean of Chelmsford, it was announced last week. He will succeed the Very Revd Peter Judd, who retired last month, in the New Year.

The next Archdeacon of the Richmond area will be the Ven. Paul Slater, Archdeacon of Craven, in Bradford diocese. He will be appointed as Archdeacon of Richmond early next year, before becoming Archdeacon of Richmond and Craven after the creation of the diocese of West Yorkshire & the Dales on Easter Day, 20 April 2014.

Publishing CEO to retire

THE general secretary and chief executive officer of the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge (SPCK), Simon Kingston, is to retire on 31 December 2013, it was announced earlier this month. Making the announcement, the Bishop of Oxford and chair of SPCK's trustees, the Rt Revd John Pritchard, said: "Simon has done a very fine job in fast-moving times." The SPCK publishing director, Joanna Moriarty, will take over in January while the trustees consider a successor.

Premier advert ban upheld

THE Court of Appeal ruled on Tuesday to uphold a decision to ban a radio advertisement asking Christians to report their experience of marginalisation in the workplace. London Christian Radio Ltd and Christian Communications Partnership Ltd objected, in 2011, to the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport's decision to prohibit the advertisement, after the Radio Advertising Clearance Centre claimed that it had a political objective. Premier Christian Radio placed an advertisement in the national press (right) protesting at the judgement.

Interfaith singers welcome in new choir

THE Three Faiths Foundation has founded an interfaith choir, as part of its Urban Dialogues programme. The choir's conductor, Jeremy

Haneman, said that "Mixed Up Chorus" is open to "people who believe that, wherever you were born, whatever your beliefs, whether you're a smoked salmon bagel or a chicken balti, the more we do together, the more we understand and benefit from being with each other".

www.3ff.org.uk/mixed-up-chorus

Corrections. The photo accompanying our review of Sheila Rowe's book Clergy Wives' Stories: Fifteen oral histories from the 1950s to the present day (Reviews, 15 November), did not depict the author, as stated. The caption should have read: "Sue Howden with her husband, John, in 1997". Our apologies. Also, the village of Odell, mentioned in our story about thefuture location of the Greenbelt Festival, is in Bedfordshire, not Northamptonshire.

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