*** DEBUG START ***
*** DEBUG END ***

Notice board

by
21 June 2013

iStock

Fiction

JOHN MADELEY's novel Let Live: A bike ride, climate change and the CIA covers some very important issues. David Fulshaw, an environmental journalist, undertakes a bicycle journey in Africa. As he rides, he becomes so incensed by the effects of climate change on people's lives that he uses his writing skills to bring these to wider attention. In doing so, he strongly criticises the United States and other Western policies, and, as a result, riles the CIA, which decides that he needs to be silenced (Longstone Books, £8.99; 978-0-9568344-1-6).

Lion Hudson launched a new fiction imprint this spring. The publishing house has produced fiction previously, but under different imprints; now they are all brought under one umbrella, Lion Fiction. The titles already published include the following:

A new edition of Stephen Lawhead's Avalon: The return of King Arthur (£7.99 (£7.20); 978-1-78264-014-1), which was previously published in the United States. Set in the future, this book begins with the death of the king, bringing the British monarchical line to an end. Power struggles are the order of the day, when a young Scot, James Stuart, lays his claim to be the Once and Future King.

Fishers of Men (£7.99 (£7.20); 978-1-78264-000-4) by Pam Rhodes. Neil Fisher begins his curacy in Dunbridge, but it's not all straightforward. Neil's progression through his first year has some tricky moments, not least when it comes to coping with four women (his mother, his training incumbent, his neighbour, and Wendy of the church music group) who all have their own ideas about him.

The Reichenbach Problem (£7.99 (£7.20); 978-1-78264-016-5) by Martin Allison Booth tells the story of a jaded Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, who escapes to a mountain village in search of privacy. While there, he becomes involved in the investigation into the death of a fellow tourist, and even finds himself under suspicion.

Another death provides the material for Donna Fletcher Crow's An Unholy Communion (£7.99 (£7.20); 978-1-78264-004-2). Ascension Day celebrations are disrupted when the body of a former student falls from the top of the tower at the College of the Transfiguration. Later on, a youth-group pilgrim, Felicity, at whose feet the body landed, and her fiancé find themselves caught up in a sinister mystery.

The Screwtape Letters by C. S. Lewis were published first in 1942. Magnificent Malevolence (£7.99 (£7.20); 978-1-78264-018-9) lets readers know what has been happening in hell since then. Derek Wilson has edited the diaries of Crumblewit, Order of the Sons of Darkness, First Class, which chart his career as a devil.

Humans, angels and demons find themselves at war, after the corruption of a European businessman who has sold his soul to evil, and whose aim is to bring down the G8. Disaster is averted in Angelguard: Not all the spirits are good (£7.99; 978-1-78264-002-8) by Ian Acheson, but the war continues in a planned sequel Angelguard: Wrestling with Shadows.

Church Times Bookshop

Save money on books reviewed or featured in the Church Times. To get your reader discount:

> Click on the “Church Times Bookshop” link at the end of the review.

> Call 0845 017 6965 (Mon-Fri, 9.30am-5pm).

The reader discount is valid for two months after the review publication date. E&OE

The Church Times Archive

Read reports from issues stretching back to 1863, search for your parish or see if any of the clergy you know get a mention.

FREE for Church Times subscribers.

Explore the archive

Welcome to the Church Times

​To explore the Church Times website fully, please sign in or subscribe.

Non-subscribers can read four articles for free each month. (You will need to register.)