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Cameron: selling all ‘a little difficult’

16 August 2013

PA

More at home: David Cameron at Battersea Dogs' Home with a volunteer, James Moore, and Bertie, a nine-month-old Yorkshire Terrier, on Tuesday

More at home: David Cameron at Battersea Dogs' Home with a volunteer, James Moore, and Bertie, a nine-month-old Yorkshire Terrier, on Tuesday

THE teachings of Jesus can be applied "very directly to daily life" - except for the instruction to sell one's possessions and give the proceeds to the poor, the Prime Minister has suggested.

Speaking on Thursday of last week at a "Cameron Direct" event, Mr Cameron appeared taken aback when a member of the audience asked: "What would your response to Jesus be on his instruction to us to sell all our possessions and give the proceeds to the poor?"

Mr Cameron said that it was the first time that he had been asked such a question. It quickly became apparent that he had not thought it through in much detail.

As a "Christian and an active member of the Church of England", he said, "I sometimes struggle with some of the sayings and some of the instructions, and some of the parts of faith, as I think most people of faith do.

"But what I think is so good about Jesus's teachings is there are lots of things that he said that you can still apply very directly to daily life and to bringing up your children. Simple things like: 'Do to others as you would be done by'; 'Love your neighbour as yourself'; the Ten Commandments; the Sermon on the Mount. To me they're still pretty fresh and good instructions."

However, Mr Cameron admitted that he found the instruction to sell one's possessions and give the money to the poor - a teaching of Jesus which was observed by the Early Church - "a little bit more difficult. . .

"I'm not saying religion is like pick and mix; you just pick the bits you like. But I've always felt the strength of the Christian faith is the basic core of moral guidance. You can find moral guidance from other sources, but it's not a bad handbook."

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