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Challenge to C of E Pensions Board policy

by
01 February 2013

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From Canon S. D. Earis
Sir, - With the final announcement of the abolition of the State Second Pension (S2P), I think that the Church of England Pensions Board has some explaining to do.

The demise of S2P has been heralded for several years, and was so at the time that the Board, to lessen its pensions burden, persuaded the General Synod to move to S2P to support Clergy Pensions. You published a letter of mine (24/31 December 2010) which questioned whether this reliance, which has cost clergy significant amounts of extra National Insurance month by month, was sensible in the circumstances.

Perhaps the Board could say whether this shifting of the burden to the clergy has, in any sense, been value for money, when the long-expected abolition of S2P and the new enhanced state pension in 2017 seems, as has always been the intention, to favour specifically groups, like most of the clergy, who are lower paid.

S. D. EARIS
The Vicarage, 28a Yarmouth Road
North Walsham NR28 9AT

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