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Home news in brief

by
14 September 2012

Health minister: allow assisted death at home

The newly appointed Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Health, Anna Soubry, said in an interview with The Times on Saturday that it was "ridiculous and appalling that people have to go abroad to end their life instead of being able to end their life at home". A spokesman for the Prime Minister said on Monday: "There are very strong arguments on both sides of the debate [about assisted dying]. It is an issue that will no doubt be debated further in the future. But it is one for Parliament to decide, and it is always an issue of conscience."

Micah Challenge appoints new chairman

MICAH Challenge, a Christian anti-poverty movement, has appointed Marnix Niemeijer, managing director of Tear, a Christian charity in the Netherlands, as its new chairman. "The appointment comes at a crucial stage for Micah Challenge, with just three years to go before the 2015 deadline for world governments to hit the Millennium Development Goals on poverty that were set in 2000," a statement said.

Dr Newcombe new vice-chairman of FiF

Dr Lindsay Newcombe has been elected the new vice-chairman of Forward in Faith (FiF), it was announced on Thursday of last week. Dr Newcombe replaces Sister Anne Williams, who is retiring. The Bishop of Ebbsfleet, the Rt Revd Jonathan Baker, who is the chairman of FiF, said that members of FiF could "draw great encouragement from the appointment of such an able and faithful young woman". 

Employment law has created 'dishonest' lawyers

THE director of the think tank Civitas, said on Monday that employment discrimination law "has created a thriving market for dishonest no-win, no-fee lawyers, because there is no limit to the amount of potential compensation awarded". Mr Green called on the Government to limit compensation for discrimination cases to a maximum of £5000.

 

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