PM backs right to wear cross at work

13 July 2012

THE Prime Minister has pledged to change the law to ensure that Christians can wear crosses at work. Speaking during Prime Minister's Questions in the House of Commons on Wednesday afternoon, David Cameron said that he fully supported the right of people to wear religious symbols at work. He described it as "a vital religious freedom".

He was responding to a question from the Conservative MP for Haltemprice and Howden, David Davis, who wanted to know why the Government was resisting a European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) appeal from the former British Airways worker Nadia Eweida, who was told that wearing a cross conflicted with British Airways's uniform policy ( News, March 16).

Mr Davis described the case as "a disgraceful piece of political correctness by British Airways". He said: "I was surprised to see the Government was resisting Miss Eweida's appeal. I cannot believe the Government is supporting the suppression of religious belief in the workplace. So what are we going to do about this case?"

Mr Cameron said: "For once I can say that I wholeheartedly agree with my honourable friend. If it turns out that the law has the intention as it has come out in this case, we will change the law, and make clear that people can wear religious emblems at work."

Miss Eweida lost her case at an employment tribunal, employment appeals tribunal, Court of Appeal, and the UK Supreme Court. She has now lodged a claim with the ECHR, which is due to be heard on 4 September, some six years after the issue first arose.

The General Synod this week endorsed a motion calling on Christians to manifest their faith in public (General Synod, page 5).

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