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24 August 2011

Focus on food at Creation Time, Chartres urges

THE Bishop of London, the Rt Revd Richard Chartres, this week encour­aged churches to celebrate the season of Creation Time, from 1 September to 4 October, by focusing on the part played by food in God’s creation and in people’s lives. Bishop Chartres, who is chairman of the Church of Eng­land’s Shrinking the Footprint environment campaign, said: “The prayer of thanksgiving transforms the fruits of creation into gifts of divine love, and Creationtime is a season for contemplating this wonderful mystery.”

Former Beverley Minster vicarage up for sale

AN OLD vicarage, which stands in the shadow of Beverley Minister and was once occupied by the Revd Joseph Coltman, a 19th-century priest who was said to be one of the largest men in England, has been put on sale by its present owners for £1.15 million. The estate agent’s brochure says that the vicarage has been privately owned since the 1960s, and “was reputedly adapted to accept his large frame with the installation of a reinforced floor beneath his bed and the widening of some internal doors”.

Provost attacked by eagle

THE Provost of St Ninian’s Cathedral, Perth, the Very Revd Hunter Farquharson, was attacked last week by a sea eagle while trying to protect his poultry. Provost Far­quharson, who breeds Toulouse geese, was quoted in the Perthshire Advertiser as saying he had returned home last Friday “to find a goose with its face ripped to shreds. . . A short while later the sea eagle re­turned and chased a gander into a hut. I went over to see it off, and it turned on me.” Provost Far­quharson suffered a four-inch cut to his back.

Correction. A recent feature, “How can girls still be girls?” (24 June), contained in­correct information about Tanith Carey, author of Where Has My Little Girl Gone? (Lion). She is a Buddhist; her father, now deceased, was a Hindu. We apologise for the errors in the original article.

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