Statistics show parishes opposed to women priests

by
27 October 2010

by Ed Beavan

THE Church of England this week published for the first time figures showing the number of parishes declared to be opposed to the ordina­tion of women as priests.

The statistics, which are based on data collected on 1 January this year, reveal that there are 802 parishes under Resolution A (6.2 per cent of all parishes); 966 where Resolution B applies (7.5 per cent); and 363 par­ishes where a petition for extended epis­copal ministry applies (2.8 per cent).

Compared with the year 2000, there has been a 4.1-per-cent de­crease in the number of Resolution A par­ishes, a 1.4-per-cent drop in Res­olu­­­tion B parishes, and a 22.6-per-cent in­crease in the number of par­ishes where a petition for extended epis­copal ministry applies.

Other statistics released this week from the year 2008 show that tax-efficient planned giving increased among Church of England parishes, averaging £9.77 a week per person, from a total of 514,000 givers, up from an average of £9.65 the previous year.

The 2008 figures reveal that the total income of parishes exceeded £900 million for the first time, totalling £925 million, up from £898 million the year before.

Figures on the number of children and young people involved in church-related activities were also published for the first time. It showed that in 2008, 86,300 children aged between five and seven, and 102,200 children aged between eight and ten, were involved in church-related activites.

In figures from 2007, a total of 98,400 young people aged between 11 and 15 were involved in church-related activities, and 32,900 in the 16-to-25 age-range.

Information on numbers of or­dina­tion candidates shows that 491 were accepted for training in 2009, mak­ing a total of 1338 in training. A total of 564 new deacons were ordained in 2009 — ten fewer than the year be­fore. A total of 309 of these were en­tering full-time paid ministry, com­pared with 321 the previous year.

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The average age of ordinands appears to be rising. Last year, 74 candidates recommended for ordina­tion training were aged between 20 and 29 (down from 112 in 1998). But the number of candidates aged 50 to 59 has gone up from 86 to 126 in the same ten-year period.

The figures show that at the end of last year there were 28,000 licensed and authorised ministers, both ordained and lay.

Statistics collated on 31 December 2009 show that the average age of stipendiary clerics is 51; the average age of diocesan bishops is 60; and the average age of suffragan and assistant bishops is 56.

The Church’s National Steward­ship and Resources Officer, Dr John Preston, said that the increased amount of giving in parishes showed “the high level of commitment” that many people had shown.

He said that income from legacies had also reached its highest ever level of £48.1 million.

Bishops' house and garden costs fall

THE working costs of Church of England bishops decreased slightly in 2009 compared with the previous year, figures released this week by the Church Commissioners have re­vealed, writes Ed Beavan.

Bishops' house and garden costs fall

THE working costs of Church of England bishops decreased slightly in 2009 compared with the previous year, figures released this week by the Church Commissioners have re­vealed, writes Ed Beavan.

The total office and working costs of all 113 bishops were £15.6 million for the year ending 31 December 2009, a reduction of about £400,000 from 2008, when their costs were a little more than £16 million. The figures cover the office and working costs of the Archbishops of Canter­bury and York, the 44 dio­cesan bishops, and 69 suffragan and area bishops.

The total office and working costs of all 113 bishops were £15.6 million for the year ending 31 December 2009, a reduction of about £400,000 from 2008, when their costs were a little more than £16 million. The figures cover the office and working costs of the Archbishops of Canter­bury and York, the 44 dio­cesan bishops, and 69 suffragan and area bishops.

Most of the expenditure went towards support staff, including staff salaries, employers’ National Insur­ance and pension contribu­tions, and office costs. The total came to £9,029,748, up from £8,910,312 in 2008.

Most of the expenditure went towards support staff, including staff salaries, employers’ National Insur­ance and pension contribu­tions, and office costs. The total came to £9,029,748, up from £8,910,312 in 2008.

The individual working costs of the bishops were £2,294,870, an increase from £2,263,862 in 2008. This covers the lease of official cars, the payment of drivers, fuel, travel, and sub­sistence, and hospitality for func­tions held mainly in bishops’ homes. Bishops spent £585,501 on hos­pitality, marginally lower than £589,703 in 2008.

The individual working costs of the bishops were £2,294,870, an increase from £2,263,862 in 2008. This covers the lease of official cars, the payment of drivers, fuel, travel, and sub­sistence, and hospitality for func­tions held mainly in bishops’ homes. Bishops spent £585,501 on hos­pitality, marginally lower than £589,703 in 2008.

The total costs also include £622,813 towards the maintenance of Lam­beth Palace, an increase from £536,914 in 2008.

The total costs also include £622,813 towards the maintenance of Lam­beth Palace, an increase from £536,914 in 2008.

Costs of overseas travel by the Archbishops of Canterbury and York on Anglican Communion business and by bishops representing the Church of England are also included in these figures, and increased by only £83 to £114,276 from 2008.

Costs of overseas travel by the Archbishops of Canterbury and York on Anglican Communion business and by bishops representing the Church of England are also included in these figures, and increased by only £83 to £114,276 from 2008.

The Commissioners also spent a further £5.1 million on bishops’ stipends in 2009, the same total as the previous year. The main area of saving came in the £5.9 million spent on maintaining the houses, offices, and gardens of archbishops and diocesan bishops. This is a decrease from £7.3 million in 2008.

http://www.cofe.anglican.org/info/statistics/churchstats2008/statisticsfront2008.html

 

The Commissioners also spent a further £5.1 million on bishops’ stipends in 2009, the same total as the previous year. The main area of saving came in the £5.9 million spent on maintaining the houses, offices, and gardens of archbishops and diocesan bishops. This is a decrease from £7.3 million in 2008.

http://www.cofe.anglican.org/info/statistics/churchstats2008/statisticsfront2008.html

 

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