Pro-Israel group slams ‘ghastly’ statement

by
14 May 2009

A PRO-ISRAELI group has expressed its anger over an ACC resolution on the Middle East, calling it “a ghastly pronouncement” that threatened to sabotage Anglican-Jewish relations.

The resolution calls on Israel to end its occupation of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip, freeze immediately all settlement-building, remove the separation barrier where it violates Palestinian land beyond the Green Line, end home demolitions, and close checkpoints in the Palestinian Territories.

It concludes: “Recognising that the city of Jerusalem is holy to Christianity, Islam and Judaism and is not therefore the monopoly of any one religion, upholds the view that members of all three faith groups should have free access to their holy sites.”

Anglican Friends of Israel said on Tuesday: “Once again, Anglican represent­atives have singled out Israel for criticism without placing her actions in context or directly addressing the Palestinian contri­bution to the conflict. . . Israel is falsely accused of imposing an ‘apartheid’ system on Palestinians whilst the education of Palestinian children to hate Jews and give their lives in the cause of Israel’s destruction is ignored. . .

“The Church must act quickly to counter this ghastly pronouncement, which threatens to com­pletely sabotage Anglican-Jewish relations.”

A bigger storm of protest followed a resolution passed at the ACC meeting in 2005. It was interpreted as a call for disinvestment in Israel, and The Daily Tele­graph called it “sanctimonious claptrap”.

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