*** DEBUG START ***
*** DEBUG END ***
Important information: We are currently experiencing technical issues with the webiste and it is currently running with reduced functionality, some category pages may not contain a full list of articles and the search is not currently working. We apologise for the inconvenience and should have everything back to normal as soon as possible.

What the Church has lost in St Luke’s closure

by
13 May 2009

iStock

From Mr John Skuse

Sir, — I write at the suggestion of some of my clergy patients to offer a non-clergy view on the demise of St Luke’s.

My qualifications are an appoint­ment as Honorary Consultant at St Luke’s for the last 31 years, and also that I had the dubious distinction of carrying out the last ever operation on a clergy patient.

As I walked out of the hospital for the last time, I did ponder on just what the Church has lost. The newly refurbished hospital was the equal, size for size, of any. The atmosphere was calm, warm, and welcoming, and the quality of nursing superb.

While we acknowledge that the NHS in recent years has answered more and more the needs of the clergy, we cannot be sure just what is ahead in the current financial climate, and it could be that in the not too distant future the loss of the hospital will be greatly regretted — too late to retract, and with no chance of rerplacement.

If a lesson is to be learned, then, it is that any similar facet of the Church, in organisation, people, or buildings, should be very carefully nurtured.

JOHN SKUSE
33 Weymouth Street
London W1G 7BY

Letters to the editor

Letters for publication should be sent to letters@churchtimes.co.uk.

Letters should be exclusive to the Church Times, and include a full postal address. Your name and address will appear alongside your letter.

Church Times: about us

The Church Times Podcast

Interviews and news analysis from the Church Times team. Listen to this week’s episode online

Welcome to the Church Times

​To explore the Church Times website fully, please sign in or subscribe.

Non-subscribers can read four articles for free each month. (You will need to register.)