100 Years Ago

by
25 July 2007

The Crown in patronage

July 26th, 1907.

IT WAS announced the other day that Mr Trevelyan’s successor at St Matthew’s, Westminster, was to be Mr Hockley, the vicar of St Saviour’s, Hoxton, and it was expected that he would be instituted last Sunday. The Bishop of London went to St Matthew’s, and announced in his sermon that there was to be no institution that day, Mr Hockley, with his lordship’s approval, having withdrawn his resignation of the Hoxton benefice. The reason for his doing so was the discovery that his probable successor would have revolutionised the teaching and practice at St Saviour’s Church. We do not know whom most to admire, Mr Hockley, who has resolved to stay with his East End flock, or the Bishop who joined in a public protest against the nomination, by the Crown, of a Low Churchman to a parish which, for forty years, has been worked on Catholic lines. Due regard ought to be paid by patrons to local conditions, with a view to maintaining something like continuity in the religious life of a parish, lest consciences should be wounded, and people driven away from the Church, in consequence of a violent breach. There is, we are glad to see, a chance that the Bishop himself will become the patron of St Saviour’s, if he is able to carry out an arrangement which he has been negociating with the Crown authorities — namely, to divide the seventeen livings which are alternately “Crown and Bishop” into two groups, one of which will be vested in the Crown, and the other in the Bishop.

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