A handful of green ideas that might be recycled

by
03 January 2008

St Osmund’s, Derby, recycles aluminium cans. This contributes to sustainable waste management and brings an income to the church. Grant-aid funding was received from the local authority. Cans are brought for recycling mainly by non-worshippers, indicating the evangelistic potential of recycling.

From 1995 to 2005, Trinity Methodist Church, Immingham, undertook newspaper recycling to supply a local plasterboard factory. This shows that a church can co-ordinate and run a community waste scheme and work with a local business. The waste paper was delivered to the factory immediately after collection, so that it did not need to be stored by the church.

From 1995 to 2005, Trinity Methodist Church, Immingham, undertook newspaper recycling to supply a local plasterboard factory. This shows that a church can co-ordinate and run a community waste scheme and work with a local business. The waste paper was delivered to the factory immediately after collection, so that it did not need to be stored by the church.

The scheme was well-supported by householders throughout Immingham, who knew that the scheme was run by Trinity Methodist Church: this meant that many people identified with the church, even though they were not regular worshippers or church members.

A double income was generated for the church, from: (a) payments made to the church by the factory for paper received; and (b) recycling credits payments from the local authority for diverting newspaper from landfill. These are discretionary payments that a local waste authority is allowed to make. The rate of recycling credits payable is based on the actual savings to the Authority, and is calculated at the equivalent value of the landfill tax.

Trinity Methodist Church has recently benefited from a grant made by Waste Recycling Environmental through the Landfill Tax Credit Scheme for the installation of new windows in the church hall.

Advertisement

Evesham Methodist Church recycles non-ferrous metals, and undertakes composting. The can-recycling scheme was started by the church before the district council began kerbside can-recycling collections. The introduction of can recycling by the district council has reduced the quantity of used cans that the church handles, but there is still a steady flow of cans and other non-ferrous metals to the church. These are crushed and sold on to a metals merchant.

Evesham Methodist Church recycles non-ferrous metals, and undertakes composting. The can-recycling scheme was started by the church before the district council began kerbside can-recycling collections. The introduction of can recycling by the district council has reduced the quantity of used cans that the church handles, but there is still a steady flow of cans and other non-ferrous metals to the church. These are crushed and sold on to a metals merchant.

Selly Oak Methodist Church, Birmingham, recycles small items that are not collected for recycling by the local authority. The “green machine” in the foyer of the church is an original work of art: a box divided into compartments for different kinds of recyclable materials.

Selly Oak Methodist Church, Birmingham, recycles small items that are not collected for recycling by the local authority. The “green machine” in the foyer of the church is an original work of art: a box divided into compartments for different kinds of recyclable materials.

These materials include: spectacles; printer cartridges; postage stamps; egg boxes; foreign coins; used envelopes; mobile phones; aluminium foil; pill boxes; batteries.

Christ Church, Chineham, near Basingstoke (an ecumenical project combining Baptist, Church of England, Methodist, and United Reformed Churches), also recycles small items that are not collected for recycling by the local authority. These include: used postage stamps; plastic bottle tops from supermarket milk bottles; foreign coins; unwanted knitting wool; unwanted household items. The charity that used to take the plastic bottle tops has recently ceased to collect them, and the church must now make contact itself with the plastics merchant if it is to continue to collect these items.

This recycling activity extends the mission of the church within the local community, as well as enabling outreach activity and the provision of financial and material donations to charitable organisations.

All Saints’, Crawley Down, engages in recycling and composting. Worshippers and non-worshippers bring unwanted household items to the church (such as bedding and clothes) to be taken to a local hostel for the homeless.

Bins in the churchyard are marked “Rubbish” and “Compost”. After a few months, visitors to graves in the churchyard got used to these new arrangements, and now most waste goes into the correct bin. The bins are emptied at least once a week by the churchyard caretaker, whose commitment to sustainable waste management makes the composting and recycling by the church successful.

All Saints’, Wokingham, engages in composting, and has a local recycling directory on its website. Visitors to graves are asked to place green waste for composting in bins that are provided in the churchyard.

The Friends of All Saints’ Churchyard have constructed a series of three composters in the churchyard. The recycling directory gives details of how to recycle various materials in the vicinity of Wokingham.

Subscribe now to get full access

To explore the Church Times website fully, please sign in or subscribe.

Non-subscribers can read seven articles each month for free.