Win a flock

by
02 November 2006


YOUNG PEOPLE are being encouraged to get involved with the G8 Summit in July ( News, 24 March) through an internet competition supported by Christian charities. It is offering as prizes livestock and trees for the developing world. The Make Poverty History campaign and others are pressing the Government to take a lead on policies for the developing world at the summit in Scotland.

The competition, organised by the charity Giving Nation ( www.g-nation.co.uk), is  challenging schools to upload their website pages on to the G-nation site. Monthly prizes will be awarded in a range of categories, including Charity Photo of the Month, Best Charity Events Calendar, and Most Innovative Charity Activity. Prizes in the G8 competition will include a flock of sheep, a pig or 100 fruit trees.

The development agencies World Vision and Send a Cow are supporting the G-Nation youth initiative by supplying the prizes, which will then be sent to poorer parts of the world on behalf of the schools.

Pat Simmons of the charity Send a Cow ( www.sendacow.org.uk) said: "This is a great opportunity for us to promote the work that we do to a younger generation. The gift packs work well, in that pupils can see pictures of the types of communities they are helping. It offers them a sense of achievement and a focus for their fundraising."

World Vision's gifts have been selected from their alternative gift catalogue at www.greatgifts.org.

G-Nation is funded by the charity sector, the Home Office, and the DfES. It is part of the Citizenship Foundation, a partnership aiming to develop the culture of giving and citizenship.

 

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