Not a sin to fly to Kenya, at least

by
02 November 2006

(CREDIT: iStock)

(CREDIT: iStock)

Sir, The Bishop of Londo< href="/80256fa1003e05c1/httppublicpages/9ef2bea8e53a4cf6802571b8004ebd89?opendocument(news, 28 july) paints a gloomy picture of air travel and transport. tsuggest that we who fly are sinners is nonsense: he should look more closely athe ten commandments.let us take a more optimistic view. i have watched kenya develop for morthan 40 years, two of our children having been born there. we now fly there foholidays at the coast, and visit the game reserves. tourism is a principaexport, and provides employment not only for those working directly in thtourist trade, but also those who grow or catch the food we eat, those whdrive us around, and a range of service industries.nearest in importance to tourism is the export of flowers by air: flowerare of relatively high value and low bulk density: ideal for transport by airkenya is usually self-sufficient in fruit, vegetables, meat, and staples. theris a strong food industry. in my observations, only wine cannot be made locallthe bishop seems to want africans to revert to subsistence farming on smalplots: as our own history has shown, large-scale agriculture is the only way tsustain large urban populations, and cash crops and tourism to providessential foreign exchange, on the basis of which kenya has become a majoexporter of manufactured goods both locally and overseas.finally, if we do not visit countries such as kenya, we will not get to knothe people; the wildlife will disappear, as funds for the maintenance of threserves dry up; and unemployment will become intolerabl
david dendy
9 dibleys, blewbury
didcot
oxon ox11 9pt
paints a gloomy picture of air travel and transport. tsuggest that we who fly are sinners is nonsense: he should look more closely athe ten commandments.let us take a more optimistic view. i have watched kenya develop for morthan 40 years, two of our children having been born there. we now fly there foholidays at the coast, and visit the game reserves. tourism is a principaexport, and provides employment not only for those working directly in thtourist trade, but also those who grow or catch the food we eat, those whdrive us around, and a range of service industries.nearest in importance to tourism is the export of flowers by air: flowerare of relatively high value and low bulk density: ideal for transport by airkenya is usually self-sufficient in fruit, vegetables, meat, and staples. theris a strong food industry. in my observations, only wine cannot be made locallthe bishop seems to want africans to revert to subsistence farming on smalplots: as our own history has shown, large-scale agriculture is the only way tsustain large urban populations, and cash crops and tourism to providessential foreign exchange, on the basis of which kenya has become a majoexporter of manufactured goods both locally and overseas.finally, if we do not visit countries such as kenya, we will not get to knothe people; the wildlife will disappear, as funds for the maintenance of threserves dry up; and unemployment will become intolerabl
david dendy
9 dibleys, blewbury
didcot
oxon ox11 9pt

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