New user? Register here:
Email Address:
Password:
Retype Password:
First Name:
Last Name:
Existing user? Login here:
 
 
News >

Hurrah for season’s bleatings!


THIS IS my favourite time of year: the carol services, the hearty farewells as the congregation heads homewards from the Christmas service with a feast awaiting, the grown men roaming the land dressed in silly red romper-suits . . .

Also adding to the seasonal cheer — or to mine at least — is the annual press report best described as a "Christmas is cancelled" story. Barking local authorities (not to be confused with the London borough of Barking) seldom fail to come up with a new regulation to outlaw references to Christianity, and such stories litter the newspapers in the weeks approaching 25 December.

The Archbishop of Canterbury appealed through the pages of The Mail on Sunday for common sense to prevail. The Puritans mounted an assault on the merry-making surrounding Christmas 350 years ago; today, Dr Williams argued, the assault on the central Christian significance of the birth of Jesus is every bit as over-zealous. "If we tried to have the holiday without the story, we’d soon notice that the heart had gone out of everything," he wrote. "Let’s not be ashamed of that story. Hang on to the Christmas pudding by all means, but don’t forget the crib."

THE FACT that some American churches have decided not to open for worship on Christmas Day is far from helpful to Dr Williams or those who would echo his view in the United States. There, political correctness, assisted by the constitutional bar that prevents the government’s endorsing any particular religion, have made greetings of "Happy Christmas" unfashionable.

A fine rant by Andrew Sullivan in The Sunday Times cut through this daftness. "The solution that the Supreme Court has come up with is an eminently sensible one. Christian scenes — Mary, Joseph, and the baby Jesus — are fine on public property, as long as they are accompanied in some way by other non-religious Christmassy thingies. "So Jesus can never be too far away from Santa, or a menorah, or a Nordic pine. We have yet to enjoy the Japanese innovation of actually putting Santa on a cross, but the Supreme Court would surely not object."

Sullivan also pointed out that a defensive chorus of Christian voices demanding the preservation of Jesus at the heart of the holiday can appear just as daft. "When you hear about secret plots against Christians in a country creaking beneath the weight of gazillions of Christmas lights, trees, muzak and musical specials, you know you’ve entered the twilight zone of paranoia."

Some things, though, are sacred. Critics of President George W. Bush, take note: there is no "holiday tree" to be found at the White House, only a Christmas tree.

CHRISTMAS arrived a week early for The Mail on Sunday. "Registrars warned of bogus gay weddings," it reported, brilliantly marrying two topics liable to send a shudder through Mail executives: immigration and the first civil-partnership ceremonies this week. They wheeled out Ann Widdecombe, who concurred that, just as marriage is exploited by immigration cheats, civil partnerships are bound to be "abused", too.

Planeloads of what newspaper diary columnists like to describe as "Brazilian dancing partners" are no doubt in the air en route to Heathrow as you read this, anxious to woo a civil partner. Or perhaps not.

 

Job of the week

Professor of Divinity

London and Home Counties

Gresham CollegeFounded 1597 Gresham Professor of Divinity Gresham College has provided free public lectures for over 400 years in the City of London and now operates worldwide via the internet. Fo...  Read More

Signup for job alerts
Top feature

Finding life over death

Finding life over death

Denise Inge, who died on Easter Day this year, discovered that her home was built over a charnel house. This prompted her to write a book exploring the challenge of living well in the face of mortality  Subscribe to read more

Question of the week
Are foodbanks an effective way of dealing with poverty?

To prevent multiple voting, we now ask readers to be logged in. This is free, quick and easy, honestly. Click here to login or register

Top comment

Fighting inequality and corruption in the world

Efforts are being made to combat corruption and sharp practice in global finance. Peter Selby has seen this at first hand  Subscribe to read more

Tue 25 Nov 14 @ 13:39
Pope Francis addresses Parliament of "aged and weary" Europe - @GavinDrake reports for us from Strasbourg http://t.co/KFpO66E1Ls

Tue 25 Nov 14 @ 10:42
The number of people attending midweek services at cathedrals has doubled in the past 10 years https://t.co/JeApjBGxgb